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resilience

Pretending . . .

Pretend play can be powerful because reality can be suspended. By suspending reality, children can level the playing field and even feel that they have the advantage. After all, though children can be very wise and insightful at times, there are some real frustrations that go along with being a child, namely being younger, smaller, …Continue reading

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Downtime . . .

Downtime is important for the healthy growth and development of your child. Your child’s brain needs breaks in order to process the incoming flood of new information. Being idle allows the brain to take what it already knows and then think, reflect, and change. Idle time allows the circuitry to develop. Unstructured free time is …Continue reading

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I’d rather do it myself . . .

Sometimes, with the best of intentions, parents impede their child’s growth by putting themselves in the middle of their child’s problems. It is important to resist the temptation to steal our child’s struggles because we all learn from our mistakes. It is a gift to our children when we let them know they have ability …Continue reading

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Unexamined memories . . .

Implicit memories—our memories that are not on a conscious level—cause us to form expectations about how the world works. These expectations are based on our previous experiences, and it is important for parents to examine how subconscious memories of past experiences influence the present. Unexamined memories can be a special concern as parents care for …Continue reading

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Sharing by example . . .

Play complements love and work. Play is a critical piece in the complex dynamic of healthy physical, intellectual, and social-emotional development at all ages. When play, love, and work are all involved, learning and development are the most effective. One of the best ways to encourage our children to play and develop lifelong habits of …Continue reading

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Love, affection, respect, and forgiveness . . .

Decades of research reveal that ten essential parenting skills are important for bringing up healthy and happy kids. The skill that tops the list is the skill most parents already know, believe, and try to practice every day. The most important skill and gift is enveloped in the concept of giving lots of love and …Continue reading

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Remembering . . .

Did you know that you can help your kids improve their ability to remember? Memory is a brain function that gets stronger with practice. The more we exercise memory, the stronger it becomes. So, when you give your kids practice at remembering, you improve their ability to integrate both implicit and explicit memories. It’s easy …Continue reading

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Storytelling . . .

Telling stories is one playful way to help children address important themes in their lives, particularly those that children might prefer not to talk about. Discharging powerful feelings connected to memories and experiences is important, though, so residual feelings are not left to bubble up later in life. Stress over family changes and other fears …Continue reading

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Preparing children for the world . . .

When thinking about how to best prepare our children for the big wide world out there, developing resilience comes to mind. We hope our kids can feel secure and confident as they learn the skills they will need to cope with everyday challenges, disappointments, adversity, and trauma. One way to consider preparing our little miracles …Continue reading

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Downtime . . .

Downtime is important for the healthy growth and development of your child. Your child’s brain needs breaks in order to process the incoming flood of new information. Being idle allows the brain to take what it already knows and then think, reflect, and change. Idle time allows the circuitry to develop. Unstructured free time is …Continue reading

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