Three hops gets you just as far as one leap!
Home
 

feelings

Moral development . . .

Parents can help their children develop a sense of moral goodness with an accompanying feeling of obligation to do the right thing. The formation of “conscience” is promoted when parents nurture awareness and the development of feelings. Conscience is also promoted when parents help children understand that two people may feel differently about a situation, …Continue reading

Share
Off 

Wanting something . . .

If you have ever taken your child with you shopping, you probably realize that stores—especially stores with toys—can activate the seeking system in your child’s brain. Curiosity, exploration, willfulness, drive, expectancy, and desire are a part of this system. In addition, the seeking system activates optimal levels of dopamine and glutamate, making your child highly …Continue reading

Share
Off 

Storytelling . . .

Telling stories is one playful way to help children address important themes in their lives, particularly those that children might prefer not to talk about. Discharging powerful feelings connected to memories and experiences is important, though, so residual feelings are not left to bubble up later in life. Stress over family changes and other fears …Continue reading

Share
Off 

Transformation and play . . .

When kids play, they are not just having fun. Play allows kids to try out new ways of being, behaving, thinking, and feeling. When kids play, they are allowed to break out of established patterns and experiment with being a new self with new ways of interacting with the world. Even as adults, it is …Continue reading

Share
Off 

Active listening . . .

Really listening is active. When you, the parent, really listen to what your child is trying to tell you, it’s important to let him or her know that you are willing to listen and want to understand. It is important to try to sum up what you think your child is saying and how he …Continue reading

Share
Off 

Siblings and feelings . . .

Feelings enhance life, but they can also create some complications. If you have more than one child, quite different feelings may occur during a single shared situation. One child may feel excited about going to a first soccer game, for example, while the other sibling may feel disappointed that he isn’t getting to play. That’s …Continue reading

Share
Off 

Describing feelings . . .

Your preschooler’s ability to describe a variety of feelings is one sign of emotional thinking. A year ago your child may have acted out angry feelings through aggressive behaviors, but more recently you may be noticing that he or she expresses ideas about anger through pretend play. For example, two favorite stuffed animals may have …Continue reading

Share
Off 

Understanding naughty . . .

All parents experience times when their children exhibit challenging behaviors. Understanding the causes behind those challenging behaviors can help. If we make the mistake of looking only at children’s behavior rather than their level of distress and needs, we miss an opportunity to really understand and connect with them and to ease their difficulty. During …Continue reading

Share
Off 

Parent with a light heart . . .

When parents discipline with a light heart and a sense of humor, three important things happen: first, our feelings as parents can be managed in a positive and constructive way; second, we model for our children how to handle their emotions in an effective and constructive way; and third, we teach our children parenting skills …Continue reading

Share
Off 

Tune into your tone . . .

Words are powerful. Words can build up or break down your child’s confidence, shape her identity, and affect her emotions. And words are never just words. Words are voiced with tone and volume. When you speak to your child, the tone and volume of your voice are critically important. Children tune into your emotional tone …Continue reading

Share
Off 
1 2 3 6
Top