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Offer choices wisely . . .

Giving children choices rather than routinely telling them what to do engages the child’s higher thinking brain. By offering choices with consequences, your child will get some practice in planning and thinking through his or her choices as well as experiencing the consequences of that choice. By the age of five, most children respond well …Continue reading

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Logical consequences . . .

Consequences provide feedback for behavior, and when we provide logical consequences for our children, they will connect their choices to outcomes. Logical consequences fit a particular situation. A parent chooses a response that connects to a child’s choice, which then guides the child in the right direction. In this way, children learn they are responsible …Continue reading

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Natural consequences . . .

Natural consequences can be quite instructive for your child, and all you have to do is sit back and let the laws of nature do the teaching. The feedback your child receives from natural consequences can be less than pleasant, such as when he or she learns that going without a raincoat or umbrella on …Continue reading

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Frustration temptations . . .

Parenting has its share of frustrations, and sometimes the appropriate thing to do in response is not apparent. Frustration, impatience, confusion, and anger are all expected emotions during the parenting process—yet they are not excuses for copping out, threatening, or playing on your child’s fears. Have you ever said “Just wait until your father [or …Continue reading

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Family rules . . .

Most families have some rules. And that’s a good thing. Family rules, if based on fairness, create a sense of safety for everyone in the family. In addition, a few family rules help kids engage and wire up the thinking part of their brains, which will help them regulate their own emotions over time. Engaging …Continue reading

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To discipline effectively, know your child . . .

Knowing your child while he or she is growing is important as you practice parenting. Each child is his or her own little being, and each child will go through developmental stages differently. Effectively providing discipline will be easier if you keep this in mind. For example, toddlers throw tantrums and refuse to share toys, …Continue reading

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Is it sibling rivalry or bullying at home?

Sibling rivalry can be seen in children’s ordinary skirmishes over the TV’s remote control or a video game’s joystick. However, what about chronic physical or verbal abuse? And what if chronic physical or verbal abuse is directed primarily at one sibling? That’s bullying at home. The line between healthy relations and abusive, bullying behaviors is …Continue reading

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Offer choices wisely . . .

Giving children choices rather than routinely telling them what to do engages the child’s higher thinking brain. By offering choices with consequences, your child will get some practice in planning and thinking through his or her choices as well as experiencing the consequences of that choice. By the age of five, most children respond well …Continue reading

Share
Off 

Logical consequences . . .

Consequences provide feedback for behavior, and when we provide logical consequences for our children, they will connect their choices to outcomes. Logical consequences fit a particular situation. A parent chooses a response that connects to a child’s choice, which then guides the child in the right direction. In this way, children learn they are responsible …Continue reading

Share
Off 

Natural consequences . . .

Natural consequences can be quite instructive for your child, and all you have to do is sit back and let the laws of nature do the teaching. The feedback your child receives from natural consequences can be less than pleasant, such as when he or she learns that going without a raincoat or umbrella on …Continue reading

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