Three hops gets you just as far as one leap!
Home
 

October, 2009

Regression . . .

When children regress—that is, when they act younger and less mature than they really are—their behavior can trigger annoyance in parents. Usually, regression happens when children (and parents) are feeling stressed, as when a new sibling has arrived to join the family. To the older sibling, it seems that the adults give lots of attention, …Continue reading

Share
Off 

Encouraging compliance . . .

What are some of the healthy ways you can get your toddler to cooperate? Here are just a few ideas: Frame your request with an outcome that appeals to your child. For example, “We are going home now and then we can _________.” A toddler’s natural sense of fairness is your ally. “Please stop kicking …Continue reading

Share
Off 

Optimizing anxiety . . .

In favorable conditions, a child learns how to manage feelings of anxiety by being exposed to just the right amount of distress. The optimal amount of anxiety to be experienced by a child will depend on his or her age as well as temperament. No mathematical formula is available to guide parents in their quest …Continue reading

Share
Off 

Understand the adolescent brain . . .

Parents and teachers can get frustrated by behaviors that seem to be characteristic of the teen years—behaviors such as using bad judgment, having trouble foreseeing consequences, and acting impulsively. These “juvenile” behaviors in teens are the result of an immature adolescent prefrontal cortex. This time in a child’s development requires much patience from parents and …Continue reading

Share
Off 
Top